Monthly Archives: March 2009

Italian, the Successor of Latin

In the Roman Empire, spoken language (vulgar Latin) differed from written language (literary Latin).  Romance languages derive from vulgar Latin, the spoken variety.  The language that today we know as Italian is the one that has remained closest to the original Latin base, while other Romance languages have had external influences: French has been affected […]

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Colorful Language: A Synesthete’s World

Synesthesia, a peculiar neurological phenomenon whereby the stimulus of one sensory or cognitive pathway automatically and involuntarily cross-activates another sensory or cognitive pathway, is an incredibly interesting and intriguing topic which will be consuming the energies of many a researcher for the foreseeable future, and surely beyond.  There are many variations of synesthesia, with grapheme […]

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Subject Verb Object

Both English and Spanish follow the S-V-O (subject – verb – object) order, though each to a different degree. In contemporary English, this scheme is preferred by the majority of speakers and writers. In Spanish, it is a basic order that the language often moves away from as a result of style guidelines and individual […]

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Legal Translations

The following are the most important aspects of legal translations: The might contain the ambiguities that arise from terms, concepts, or institutions that do not coincide between the legal systems of the source and target languages. In order to properly complete the translation, the translator must use a reliable manual or dictionary that clearly defines […]

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Different Types of Calque

Paronymous calque or loan word: is the result of an incorrect correspondence between two words that have similar forms or etymologies but that have evolved differently in their respective languages to the point that they now have different meanings (semantic transfer). At times it happens because, between two words etymologically related in English, but with […]

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Learning Languages Is Respecting Others

Economic globalization implies a tendency towards homogeneity and uniformity. In this sense, globalization goes hand in hand with the English language. Once, the French language had its golden era with territorial conquest and an aura of enlightenment, diplomacy and law. Today, across the world, 264.1 million people speak/study French, according to the Ministry of Foreign […]

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