The , whose corpus of texts now contains over 2 billion words, recently released its list of new words for inclusion in the Eleventh edition in the Revised Edition of its Concise .

http://www.askoxford.com/worldofwords/newwords/?view=uk

Some of my thoughts:

  • “Best”, as used in phrases such as “best of breed” is now in the dictionary. Does this mean that the expression (and eponymous movie) “Best in Show” has been incorrect all of these years? Wow, I had no idea.

  • “Crunk” is now identified as a word! There will be quite the celebration tonight!

  • “Emulsion” is now a word you can use when you can’t think of “sauce”.

  • “Therapize” or “Therapise” are the latest examples of making any noun a verb by adding the “-ize/ise” ending, which is acceptable in a fluid language like where things change every day, but it is also a somewhat lazy practice.

So, as you can see, English is very much alive and dynamic. Its vocabulary expands non-stop and translators and people who hire translation services should always be familiar with the new words in order to include them in their latest works.

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