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Etymology: The DNA of Words

The word “etymology” comes from the Latin word “etymologĭa” and also the Greek word “ἐτυμολογία,” which is composed of “ἔτυμος étimos” (true sense”), and “λογία” (“the study of”). Therefore, etymology is the study of the meaning of words, or parts thereof. For example, Latin and Greek are two “heavyweights,” as they are the source of […]

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Portmanteau: More than a Coatrack and a Suitcase

The Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary defines portmanteau as (1) a large suitcase or (2) “a word or morpheme whose form and meaning are derived from a blending of two or more distinct forms (as smog from smoke and fog).” In this blog post, we will be exploring the second definition provided by this famous dictionary, although […]

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The Etymology of the Word “OK”

Consider the following hypothetical conversation between two people: – Hey, you want to meet up this afternoon? – Yeah, that sounds good. Your place at 8? – OK, see you then Does anyone find it difficult to understand this conversation? Probably not. Is there a term foreign to them? Not really. What’s that “OK”? What […]

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Different Types of Calque

Paronymous calque or loan word: is the result of an incorrect correspondence between two words that have similar forms or etymologies but that have evolved differently in their respective languages to the point that they now have different meanings (semantic transfer). At times it happens because, between two words etymologically related in English, but with […]

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