Blog Archives

Etymology: The DNA of Words

The word “etymology” comes from the Latin word “etymologĭa” and also the Greek word “ἐτυμολογία,” which is composed of “ἔτυμος étimos” (true sense”), and “λογία” (“the study of”). Therefore, etymology is the study of the meaning of words, or parts thereof. For example, Latin and Greek are two “heavyweights,” as they are the source of […]

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Helianthus vs. Sunflower – Are botanical translations a real challenge?

I’ve always been intrigued by the real and complex names of flowers. Who knew that a sunflower is actually called helianthus or that Lanicera caprifolium means honeysuckle? I bet the majority of you don’t and that’s why when it comes to literary translations it’s really important that linguists are familiarized with these terms and also […]

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How About Some Dictionary Interaction?

Translators, editors, lexicologists, philologists, poets and other language professionals will no doubt find a novel source of joy in this new online resource: an interactive (and very practical) version of our beloved (but often impractical) Diccionario de la Real Academia (Dictionary of the Royal Spanish Academy). The brain behind Goodrae (that is how he baptized […]

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The Translation of Musical Notes

We all know that there are many differences between terms that are commonly used by Spanish speakers and those used in English. Thanks to globalization and the vast amount of information we receive through music, movies, social networking and the exchange of information of all kinds, it’s plain to see that certain basic things are […]

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Anne Dacier’s Translation Legacy

In almost every discipline there are certain individuals who achieve fame and become memorable; they are admired by their peers in the field. These personalities usually transcend their area of specialty and are recognized worldwide. However, this does not happen often in translation. Why is it so? It is a difficult question to answer. But, […]

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