Blog Archives

The Language of Emotions

All humans are able to make the same sounds. However, each language has its own particular way of employing them. Just as each language follows different grammatical rules, it also uses different sounds to express emotion, though some may seem more similar than others. Depending on our mother tongue, some sounds will be more or […]

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3 Ways Pronunciation Can Get Lost in Translation

A Spanish-native friend of mine recently recommended I watch a new Netflix series which has gone viral; you may have heard of “Stranger Things”. There was some initial confusion, however, because my friend didn’t say “Things”, but rather “Fings”. This phenomenon caught my attention: (it always has actually, and that’s why I’ve decided to write […]

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Another glance at English UK

A few weeks ago we looked at the southern British Cockney and RP varieties. Throughout the United Kingdom however, many different varieties of the English language can be found. Northern England comprises cities such as Manchester, Newcastle and Sheffield. What are some of its speaker’s characteristics?   Unlike accents found in the south, northern intonation […]

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Triphthongs in Spanish

A triphthong is a sequence of three vowels making up one syllable. Some examples in Spanish would be: a – pre – ciáis, co – piéis, buey. For a triphthong to exist, two closed atonic vowels (“i” or “u”) and, between them, an open vowel (“a”, “e”, or “o”): anunciáis, guau, miau, confiéis. Sequences of […]

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Pronouncing “c” and “z” in Spanish

“Seseo” consists of pronouncing the letters “c” (before “e” and “i”) and “z” with the sound normally associated with the letter “s”. If someone speaks with seseo, they would say “serésa” for “cereza” (cherry), “sierto” for “cierto” (true), and “sapáto” for “zapato” (shoe). Seseo is used generally throughout Latin America and in the Caray Islands […]

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