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How translations can influence economic thought development

On the one hand, one of my hobbies is to read books on economics, despite my background in biology. At any rate, I am sure this connection comes through my interest in neurobiology and psychology, lingering through sociology and ending up in economics. On the other, I can’t help but reading books and papers through […]

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Using “Vos” or “Usted” in Costa Rica

  According to the Diccionario panhispánico de dudas, voseo means to use the pronominal “vos” form when talking to somebody. Though this has been shown in a previous post to be a phenomenon of the River Plate region, in Costa Rica, as in a great number of countries in the Americas, the pronoun “vos” is adopted when referring to the second person singular. However, contrary […]

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Following the steps of Malespín

“Yo estoy tuanis, pero el brete está pelis” Many people (including Spanish speakers) might hear this and have no idea what it means. It is thought that in some Central American countries what is left of Malespín is still in use, a military code attributed to the Salvadoran General Francisco Malespín (1806-1846). Even though hardly […]

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A tale of two translations

A couple of weeks ago, in the weekly Chess tactics lesson of my local club (Oh, no! Not another entry about Chess!), the game we were considering contained the following funny sentence: ¡nunca se sabe por dónde saldrá el sol! (you never know where the sun will rise!) I didn’t notice at the time, but […]

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Indigenous Translators: Between Language and Politics

America (here including North and South America) is the second largest continent in the world after Asia. It includes no less than 35 sovereign nation-states, 1 Commonwealth and at least 24 dependencies and colonies (yes, in the 21st century, believe it). Over 500 languages are spoken throughout these territories, of which only 8 are official: […]

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