Blog Archives

The Economist cracks down on Americanisms

The Economist is the well-known and acclaimed magazine newspaper(!) about…well, economics…that is published in the UK. One of its proudest principles is how it likes to take stands on issues and argue in favor of or against topics. It is read by important, influential, and intelligent people throughout the world. So as I was thumbing […]

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Lost in Translation:

The administration of the City of Buenos Aires, headed by the businessman Mauricio Macri, appears to have translated and adopted a common environmental campaign slogan in Brazil for its own faux environmental policy marketing and political greenwashing purposes. However, the direct translation to Spanish of the Brazilian phrase “Jogue Limpo” loses the polysemy which makes […]

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Christmas Traditions

In this special time of year, I would like to interrupt our MultiTerm classes in order to talk about the different ways in which Christmas is celebrated in different parts of the world. While the objective of the celebration may be the same, in every country different traditions are adopted. In Argentina, children write letters […]

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“Voseo”

What does it mean to use “vos” instead of “tú” when speaking Spanish? It’s a phenomenon that has its origins in the Spanish spoken in Argentina and Uruguay where the abovementioned subject change is used when talking to someone. Generally speaking, “vos” is used as a replacement for “tú” in conversations and texts where the […]

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Adventures in Subtitling and Soccer

I am in the midst of a true culture war here in Argentina, and all I have for protection is my trusty blanket. I was watching a broadcast of “Late Night with Conan O’Brien” the other night that was subtitled in Spanish for consumption throughout the South American Spanish-speaking countries, including Argentina, and his guests […]

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Language Preservation Policies

Public policies aiming to preserve a national language are most commonly associated with small nations, whether they be small nation-states (i.e., Iceland, Ireland, and Estonia) or minority nations within a larger nation-state (i.e., Quebecois French, Basque, Catalan, and countless indigenous languages). Nevertheless, now many larger countries are taking action to preserve their majority languages. The […]

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