Blog Archives

Understanding Shakespeare

No Fear Shakespeare is a service that translates the most difficult of languages most people encounter, the Early Modern English of Shakespeare, into contemporary English prose. As we have touched on before, translators are readers more than anything and are primarily concerned with making a work understandable for their target audience and that is exactly […]

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The Million Word Followup

As I mentioned earlier, the Global Language Monitor previewed the introduction of the one millionth word to the English language. Great publicity followed. They have returned two months later to declare that the one million word barrier has been surpassed. Fanfare abounds to celebrate this glorious day. And the GLM brand is once again associated […]

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New Language Toy (Wordnik)

I was sent over to Wordnik.com yesterday and all productive plans I had were immediately dashed and replaced with “let’s see what it says about this word…” Wordnik’s purpose is to display all working knowledge, centered around the definition, etymology, and usage examples, but also providing information such as statistics and associated images, of just […]

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Contemporary Theories on Translation: Octavio Paz

Octavio Paz asserts that language is, above all, translation (translation and literature are synonyms). Translation is always a literary operation, since it is an artistic or scientific work as it includes a “transformation” of the original that is literary in the sense that it uses literary resources (in essence, metonymy and metaphor). Translations are a […]

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Book Club Meeting #1

(And there’s enough time before Christmas for me to throw this on the wish list…finding this under my tree would instantly move the responsible commenter to #1 on the “Best Commenter” list.) If you drown yourself in the world of languages, especially historic linguistics, like I do, then you know that the release of a […]

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Reading the Text Before Translating

The translator starts the first stage of the translation process, the understanding stage. The purpose is to extract all content and expressive value to then reformulate them in the target language. Capturing and understanding the text does not end the communication process opened by the author. Instead it restarts it and the reader/translator becomes¬† a […]

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