Until the COVID-19 pandemic redefined all our borders, the leisure industry was becoming increasingly globalized, with tourism an ever-expanding sector. Niche tourism, including responsible trips and adventure travel, was an especially booming part of the travel sector until 2020 put a damper on its growth.

The Center for Responsible Travel (CREST) produced a report in 2019 pulling together relevant statistics, including a survey conducted by Exodus Travels of 1000 Americans who travel internationally. Of the travelers surveyed 91% stated they felt it was important to take ethical trips, and 78% said they were more ethically conscious than a year before.

It is also anticipated that the adventure travel market will expand significantly by 2026, with one market research report showing an anticipated doubling of activity between 2019 and 2026, particularly among 30-41 year olds. Once travel restrictions are lifted and flights return to something like pre-pandemic levels, niche travel providers should benefit from an influx of globetrotters making up for lost time.

More and more, small travel companies are appealing to international markets, acting as hubs for adventure and discovery, rather than being merely single destination or point-of-origin providers. Working in this way, companies source customers from a range of locations, matching them to travel experiences in a variety of destinations.

To make this work as a model, providers benefit significantly from their websites and print copy being available in translation. Trust is vital to the travel industry, given the uncertainties we all face when travelling. Concerns about cancellations, political upheaval, disease, transport challenges and security risks can all be alleviated if the customer truly trusts the provider. Trust is significantly increased when communication is error-free and direct, and in your own language!

A survey of over 2430 web consumers published by the Harvard Business Review showed that 72.4% of shoppers were more likely to buy a product if the site contained information in their native language. The survey was conducted in 2012 and did not specifically relate to travel but given how much trust an adventurous holidaymaker places in their provider of choice, the benefits of adding full translation to your offering are clear.

In an increasingly connected world, consumers value directness, clarity, and ease of access, three qualities that you can maximize by talking to your customers in their first language. In 2021 and beyond, going multilingual could be the most cost-effective way to widen the net and pull in frustrated would-be travelers desperate to book a much-needed getaway.

Photo Credits:

Raimond Klavins on Unsplash; Rosanna Fung on Unsplash; Mesut Kaya on Unsplash