Blog Archives

Helianthus vs. Sunflower – Are botanical translations a real challenge?

I’ve always been intrigued by the real and complex names of flowers. Who knew that a sunflower is actually called helianthus or that Lanicera caprifolium means honeysuckle? I bet the majority of you don’t and that’s why when it comes to literary translations it’s really important that linguists are familiarized with these terms and also […]

Tagged with:

Words Used Worldwide

There are 196 countries in the world and English is the official language in 60 of these. Even in countries where this language is not official, many English words are borrowed and used on a daily basis. Furthermore, many even appear on foreign language dictionaries. For example, if you’re looking to start business in other […]

Tagged with:

Some translators who made a difference

Many writers reach stardom. Just think of Shakespeare, Moby Dick and J.K Rowling, amongst others. But can any of us name famous translators? After all, how popular would J.K Rowling’s novels be if there had been no translators to help her bridge her work to the rest of the non-English speaking world? Harry Potter was […]

Tagged with:

Are Movie Titles Lost in Translation?

We all know that sometimes movie titles differ greatly to their original source when they are translated. The reason for this is not clear. Sometimes depending on the need to be localized, but others…Who knows? Here’s a look at a few examples of famous movies which have some interesting translations worldwide. The Full Monty, a […]

Another glance at English UK

A few weeks ago we looked at the southern British Cockney and RP varieties. Throughout the United Kingdom however, many different varieties of the English language can be found. Northern England comprises cities such as Manchester, Newcastle and Sheffield. What are some of its speaker’s characteristics?   Unlike accents found in the south, northern intonation […]

Tagged with:

A glance at English UK

English is the third most spoken language worldwide (preceded by Chinese and Spanish) given that it has 335,000,000 speakers. It is therefore unsurprising that how its sound can vary from one place to another. Today we’re going to have a look at one particular variety: English UK. Even though the UK is relatively small in […]

Tagged with: